Latest Update of Meta-Analysis Evaluating the Impact of Antibiotic Use on Clinical Outcomes and Treatment Response of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors: Patient Survival and Treatment Response Reduced

Latest Update of Meta-Analysis Evaluating the Impact of Antibiotic Use on Clinical Outcomes and Treatment Response of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors: Patient Survival and Treatment Response Reduced


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Latest Update of Meta-Analysis Evaluating the Impact of Antibiotic Use on Clinical Outcomes and Treatment Response of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors: Patient Survival and Treatment Response Reduced

Da Volterra is proud to present new results published at the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer’s (SITC) 36th Annual Meeting having taken place last week through a poster entitled “Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Evaluating the Impact of Antibiotic Use on Survival Outcomes and Treatment Response of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors”, which was also discussed at the Press Briefing held at the meeting opening session on November 10!

Da Volterra’s team analyzed data from 38 independent cohorts (totaling 12,304 patients) to determine whether antibiotic use is detrimental to non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients’ survival when treated with immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs). Several endpoints were carefully assessed: Overall Response Rate (ORR) and Progressive Disease (PD) Rate were analyzed in 11 studies, Progression-Free Survival (PFS) and Overall Survival (OS) were studied in data originating from respectively 29 and 36 independent cohorts.

Exposure to antibiotics around the initiation of the treatment with ICIs was confirmed to have a significant deleterious impact on all clinical outcomes, and notably on treatment response. This is hypothesized to be due to a decreased efficacy of immunotherapies following antibiotic-induced disruption of the gut microbiome. The pooled Odds Ratios for ORR and PD were respectively of 0.60 [95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.37-0.95] and 1.99 [95% CI 1.45-2.7], reflecting an impaired response to treatment in patients having received antibiotics. In addition, the pooled Hazard Ratios for OS and PFS were respectively 1.64 [95% CI 1.38-1.94] and 1.52 [95% CI 1.29-1.80], confirming decreased survival among antibiotic users.

The negative impact of antibiotics on patients’ survival was demonstrated to be particularly pronounced when antibiotics were taken shortly before or after ICI initiation, with the strongest effect occurring in the two months prior to or following ICI treatment initiation.

This updated meta-analysis confirmed and extended the previously reported results highlighting the crucial need for continued research in the area and the development of new products like DAV132 capable of protecting/modulating the gut microbiome in order to preserve the efficacy of ICIs.

The poster presented at SITC is also available here.