New review published in Drug Discovery Today highlights the crucial role of the intestinal microbiome in health and disease and the need for microbiome protectors

New review published in Drug Discovery Today highlights the crucial role of the intestinal microbiome in health and disease and the need for microbiome protectors


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New review published in Drug Discovery Today highlights the crucial role of the intestinal microbiome in health and disease and the need for microbiome protectors

Da Volterra is pleased to present the latest publication of the team on the role of the gut microbiome and its contribution to human health, the impact of antibiotic-induced dysbiosis on various diseases states, and the need to develop innovations capable of protecting the gut microbiome. The review was published in a special AMR edition of Drug Discovery Today and is available online here

The key messages from the authors are:

  • The gut microbiota is regarded nowadays as a key component for human health.
  • Dysbiosis is an unrecognized disease whose consequences just begin to be understood.
  • Antibiotics can be health-threatening due to their impact on the gut microbiota.
  • Microbiota protectors may change the way we use antibiotics in the future.

Andremont A, Cervesi J, Bandinelli PA, Vitry F, de Gunzburg J. Spare and repair the gut microbiota from antibiotic-induced dysbiosis: state-of-the-art. Drug Discovery Today. 2021 Feb 25:S1359-6446(21)00107-0. doi: 10.1016/j.drudis.2021.02.022. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 33639249.

Homeostasis of the intestinal microbiota is currently recognized as a major contributor to human health. Furthermore, intestinal dysbiosis is associated with a multitude of consequences, including intestinal colonization by antibiotic-resistant or pathogenic bacteria, such as Clostridioides difficile, and reduced efficacy of promising anticancer immunotherapies. By far, the most immediate and drastic exposure leading to dysbiosis is antibiotic treatment. Many attempts have been made to prevent or repair antibiotic-associated dysbiosis. Here, we review these innovations and the difficulties associated with their development.