New article published in the Journal of Hospital Infection highlights the need for prevention of CDI, especially in haematological patients undergoing induction chemotherapy in the USA

New article published in the Journal of Hospital Infection highlights the need for prevention of CDI, especially in haematological patients undergoing induction chemotherapy in the USA


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New article published in the Journal of Hospital Infection highlights the need for prevention of CDI, especially in haematological patients undergoing induction chemotherapy in the USA

Da Volterra is pleased to present the latest publication of the team on the burden of Clostridioides difficile in patients with hematologic malignancies. The study was published in the Journal of Hospital Infection and is available online here. The study is summarized below.

Duhalde L, Lurienne L, Wingen-Heimann SM, Guillou L, Buffet R, Bandinelli PA (2019) Excess burden associated with Clostridioides difficile infection in haematological patients occurring during hospitalization with induction chemotherapy in the United States. Journal of Hospital Infection.

Background: Patients with haematological diseases are at high risk of developing Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI).

Aim: The study aim was to describe excess length of stay and costs associated with CDI during the hospital stay for induction chemotherapy in the United States (USA).

Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted utilizing data from US databases of Truven Health Analytics®. Comprehensive hospitalization data of patients with induction chemotherapy due to acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) were analysed. Patients with CDI occurring during the hospital stay were compared to controls through a case–control comparison of the direct treatment costs and length of stay was performed with an exact matching algorithm.

Findings: A total of 2611 patients were included between January 2014 and December 2017. NHL (43.5%) and AML (38.4%) were the predominant underlying diseases and 15% of patients received a stem cell transplantation. During the matching, 105 CDI cases (CDI+) were compared with 801 controls (CDI−). On average, hospitalization costs were increased by US$36,113 in CDI+ compared to CDI− patients (P=0.009) and patients with CDI spent on average 8.9 additional days in hospital (P=0.003).

Conclusions: The findings highlight a significant burden associated with CDI in haematological patients undergoing induction chemotherapy in the USA. There is an important need for prevention of CDI in this specific patient population.